The roles of gods in ancient Greek culture was to explain aspects of Earth and life

The roles of gods in ancient Greek culture was to explain aspects of Earth and life. There was a god for almost everything that happened. Greeks used gods to interpret phenomenon such as natural disasters. For example, if the god Zeus (god of the sky and thunder) was angry, there would be a storm. As stated in “Ancient Greeks: Everyday Life, Beliefs, and Myths” on mylearning.org: “The Greeks believed in gods and goddesses who, they thought, had control over every part of people’s lives.”
The people of ancient Greece believed that the gods gave purpose to life events. They thought the gods what happened to them afterlife. For instance, ancient Greeks considered that after life a person went to the underworld where you were judged for your actions during life, and where the god, Hades, ruled. Punishments and blessings came from the gods. If they were unhappy with someone, they would discipline them to teach them a lesson, whereas is someone appealed to a god, they would bless them.
The Greeks had many different forms of worship for the gods. Temples were built for individual gods. Offerings were brought when people went to a temple. These offerings were typically food. Prayer could take place in a temple or simply at home. In addition to temples, sacred sites were places where people could pray at an altar. Festivals and sporting events took place in honor of the gods. On greece.mrdonn.org, it states “In ancient Greece, honoring the gods was part of daily life and part of just about everything they did.”