The parent-educator partnership is very important in building the child’s language learning ability

The parent-educator partnership is very important in building the child’s language learning ability. As they say; ideal setting for children’s language learning and development starts from home. Therefore, the most important thing for a parent is to have regular conversations and develop the bond between them and their child so that the child gets involved when you are explaining things or reading stories. Talking and interacting with your child helps in building language and social skills as a child grasp the accent and vocabulary.
For educators, a basic principle is to provide with language input they can understand as well as the opportunities to express themselves by hearing what they want to tell about. To provide non-verbal support, teachers may also use technology by using graphic organizers and visuals which would help in building on student’s background knowledge and experiences.
So both parent and educator should create a learning environment within their jurisdiction to help children learn cultures and languages. As we all know that learning is a continuous process therefore techniques may differ with the moving generations. To establish a learning environment, teachers have to think from the children’s perspective before they plan to interact or provide tasks. Whereas, parents to develop confidence into children by listening to them and answering their queries.
There are various strategies to create an environment. The strategies include, reading aloud a book or a story which helps build language skills. Computers and television have their place but children learn best from live speakers rather than recorded voices. About language, the best ways to teach your child is by playing games with them and elaborate on child’s attempts at language and to make sure that language and words are integral part of their learning.
The other strategy is to talk to them and plan on what to talk about and how to get the children’s interest. For planning and implementing discussions, what I consider the vital thing is the parents should be available to talk and be fully present while discussions. Usually, children do not plan to have discussions rather parents should be physically available to stimulate discussions with children. On the other hand, they may stop talking if they constantly have to seek us out or wait for us to open up, or if they observe a frequent lack of interest. Moreover, there are so many things we need to discuss and teach our children and we often fall into correcting them which might also result in your child being hesitated in expressing their opinion. So, it’s better to try and listen instead of talking to your kids.
The other strategy is, to get involved with the children’s play experience. Children do constantly use language as they play. Therefore when you are involved in their play experience and interact with children orally, that would help in developing their vocabulary. Children learn through the accents and pronunciations as they see while you are talking to them. It also helps in teaching them cultural nuances and giving them background knowledge of a particular word and its meaning.
When you are involved in dramatic plays and storytelling, it encourages a child in expressing their thoughts that would help in improve their way of thinking and understanding of oral language. Children would come up with their wishes and communicate with their parents to speak about their pretended roles that would eventually give them confidence as they grow.
References:
FELLOWES, J. AND OAKLEY, G.
Language, literacy and early childhood education
In-text: (Fellowes & Oakley, n.d.)
Fellowes, J., & Oakley, G. Language, literacy and early childhood education.