Part 2 Iceland has been ranked by the World Economic Forum

Part 2 Iceland has been ranked by the World Economic Forum (WEF) for the past nine years as the world’s most gender equality country. The global gender gap report evaluates gender equality in each countries by using measures such as economic opportunity, political empowerment, and health and survival. Due to the World Economic Forum’s gender equality campaign, which conducts the survey, thinks Iceland could be the first to close its gender gap completely. “In 2016, Iceland had closed 87% of their gender pay gap.” Eliminating the gender inequality gap is Iceland’s government plan to complete by 2020
“In Iceland, the beginning of women’s struggle for gender equality is often traced back to 1885 when Bríet Bjarnhéðinsdóttir published her article on education and the rights of women in a widely read magazine.” She became a leader for women’s rights in Iceland. A few years later, in 1907, the first women’s association which had improved rights for women was established under her leadership. An Iceland women’s movement had been created and the struggle for gender equality had begun. “During the last decade, the country has passed laws to ensure gender balance on boards, to ban strip clubs nationwide and to secure paid paternity leave for 3 months.”
“On 24 october 1975, there was a huge wave of professional and domestic strikes in Iceland.” Iceland women had refused to show up for work. They also denied to cook, clean or look after their children. Showing that they are important for society as much as men are one of the objectives for women strike. They also call for men to respect their work and demand equal pay. The previous women’s strikes in the past make Iceland has a good score on almost every front of gender parity. “The country also has had a female president for 20 of the past 50 years, nearly 50% of its parliament members are women, and it closed its health and education gender gaps many years ago.” Today, Iceland became the first country in the world which has equal pay policy. The policy forces companies to stop paying women less than men for the same work. Gap between gender in Iceland is gradually closing due to strong participation from many social groups.