n his essay

n his essay, Berger recounts the day of the Hiroshima attack in Japan. From the start he tells us his opinion on the attack with no shame. He talks about a book he once read called The Unforgettable Fire. A book made of paintings and drawings by the survivors themselves. Thanks to that book a television appeal was sent out and another big group of survivors sent their drawings, those drawings ended up being at an exhibition. “Let us leave for posterity pictures about the atomic bomb, drawn by citizens.”
Berger then goes into talking about this experience and the things he witnessed while being at the attack. The things he saw, he describes in a very real way made that makes you goosebumps. This whole essay was were very hard and sad to read. “…He looked miserable- burned and sore, and naked with only pieces of his gaiters trailing behind as he walked. Only the part of his hair covered by his soldier’s hat was left, as if he was wearing a bowl. When I touched him, his burned skin slipped off…” Berger couldn’t believe that what he was seeing was real, he says he found himself in a state of shock. He then goes into talking how children in USA schools are taught and told about the attack in Hiroshima but he argues that the kids only learn the dates because they have to and that they are only told that this was an important event for their country but not that that it was a terrorist attack. “The two bombs dropped in Japan were terrorist actions. The calculation was terrorist. The indeterminacy was terrorist. The small groups of terrorists operating today are, by comparison, humane killers.” Berger defines terrorism through the essay he then develops an argument supporting his position on the terrorist attack of Hiroshima and how strongly believes that it was a very planned terrorist attack that killed thousands of innocent people and children. Him repeating that it killed thousands of innocent people really impacted me. I do think that Berger wanted to achieve that by what his writing and use of words. I’ve heard some of my friends say that they in a way agree to what the USA did to Japan, they say that with the US doing that, less people from both sides died. I don’t think I agree with that but I really don’t want to argue or touch that debate.
For me personally, that doesn’t change the fact that thousands of innocent people and kids died. John wants kids at school to learn about the date of this event because its important and not because they have to for their history class. He wants them to be told the truth as it is. Japan was about to surrender when the bombs were dropped on innocent people. The USA really didn’t have to drop the bombs. “Nobody can be confront the reality of 6th August 1945 without being forced to acknowledge that what happened was evil. It is not a question of opinion or interpretation, but of events.” I think this was such a good conclusion to his essay and argument. I fully agree to what he says in this very well put sentence. It is what we see, we see kids crying, moms crying, death people, we can see that, that happened and we have been affected by that and no one or nothing can change that.