Just as the bell rang

Just as the bell rang, my driver’s education teacher’s voice loomed ominously over the hurried chatter as we escaped the dreadful one hour of class, “Congratulations on passing the test but remember you have to finish all your drives before the end of the semester otherwise you have to retake the class! DO NOT WAIT TILL THE LAST MINUTE!” I strutted away confidently thinking to myself that I had nothing to worry about since I had already finished most of them. Little did I know that the pace of junior year was about to speed up exponentially with the never-ending AP tests, quizzes, homework, and of course the much needed standardized tests. I failed to account for all the organization and planning that was needed to keep track of the looming deadline in the midst of all these priorities.
Soon, it was already May: a month with ups and downs. It starts with everyone’s favorite tests: the AP tests. But, when those are done, we finally have summer to enjoy. It was the 2nd week of May and I finished all my AP tests. At this point, I only had finals to worry about. It was the weekend and I’d thought that I could relax, watch a movie, and get some homework done. Then, I heard my dad call my name from upstairs, “Rohith, did you finish those drives?” My heart dropped with dread and then panic. It was the second week of May and I had three drives left. On top of that, I had three weeks until the deadline to finish all my drives. My hands started sweating to a substantial degree because if I did not finish my drives prior to the deadline, I would have to pay $500 to take the Driver’s Ed course again and, furthermore, I would have to re-do all my drives and not get my license for another nine months. The same statement I had carelessly ignored before now became the bain of my existence. I was so extensively-stressed that I sprinted upstairs to check if there are any dates left to schedule the drives. There was only one day available and I thought I was doomed. I just couldn’t swallow the truth. I told my dad the situation and he was very indignant at me. I went downstairs and I just didn’t know what to do next. My dad, on the other hand, was very patient and he was, intelligently, trying to look for solutions to move forward. While I was very dejected of my ignorant actions, he started to chat with the online customer service for about 30 minutes or so. Then, my dad called my name again and he told me “your next three drives are scheduled and you will finish your course by the deadline.” I was so astonished that he had managed to set things straight. I asked him “what’d you do?”, and he told me that he chatted with customer service about my mistake. My drives were scheduled with no fine nor consequence. I was so relieved. Moreover, I was so astounded of he handled the problem with such patience.
That equanimity came from my parents’ experience of having to adjust to an unaccustomed country as immigrants. Their diverse experiences have impacted me extensively. That day, my dad taught me a very important thing about life. Life will always send obstacles and problems your way and it’s alright if you make mistakes. But, it’s how you handle those problems with composure and diligence. As such, it is an important life skill to be prepared to embrace drawbacks and to overcome them with grace. That’s what molds you into a matured individual. I perceive that this will also be a part of the college experience because there won’t be another person to reschedule my drives or keep my life organized.