In the Apology

In the Apology, a majority of our perception of who Socrates was and the things he thought comes from Plato. Even though Plato wrote all of his philosophical works in dialogues, Socrates version is brought to life, but it is Platos version. Socrates always questioned the values of society, criticized politicians, and came up with ideas that made the establishment question him when he was finally put on trial for corrupting the youth and not worshiping the correct Gods. Socrates spoke to others in a plain, conversational matter, and for his questioning of people claiming to “experts” he was found guilty and put on trial.
The apology overall portrays Socrates defending his honor against the accusations. After being sentenced, he mentioned that he “does not fear death.” Socrates thinks it is more important to consider whether one is acting right or wrong and whether life is worth living. What was most confusing, was that Socrates was even in trial for such a thing.
He engaged in conversations with people who claimed to be experts but in reality, Socrates by only asking simple questions, revealed that these people were in fact confused and did not actually know anything about which they claimed to be an expert which made Socrates feel that the quest for wisdom and instructions of others through dialogue were the highest aims in life. He believed that he was put on trial because he felt he embarrassed many people and that the people who had voted against him and not listened to him, had harmed themselves much more than they harmed him.
In Aristotle, The quote “Tragedy imitates the action of the best people in society, and comedy the worst sorts of people in society.” This reminds me of the movie “Just Go With It” with Jennifer Aniston and Adam Sandler. In the movie, Jennifer Aniston is divorced and has two kids. Due to the divorce, she became a successful, happier, and humble person throughout that tragedy.
On the other hand, Adam Sandler in the movie left his wedding before the ceremony because he found out that his fiancee was cheating on him and was only marrying him because he was going to become a doctor. After this, in a sarcastic way, he uses his wedding ring to get with other women and avoid romantic commitments that could potentially lead to heartbreak.
In the poem “Fishhawk” the speaker of the poem feels blue about the situation, being helplessness while comparing his faithless marriage with the affection of the two fishhawks. The poem repeats “gentle maiden, pure and fair.” The repetition throughout the poem makes the reader feel the prince had a crave for the maiden, and the maiden is the only thing the seeker has eyes on. The poem overall uses a lot of imagery such as “gwan gwan” to help the reader imagine the image of the two fishhawks floating on the “sandbars of the stream.”