Black cats in Egypt were seen as an embodiment of gods

Black cats in Egypt were seen as an embodiment of gods, and they were worshipped. Though it was illegal to kill a cat, even accidentally, and the penalty was death. Egyptians’ love and respect for their black cats were so strong, that owners would often mummify their cats after death. The families would mourn their cats’ deaths as if a family member had died. And often, owners and their cats would be buried together.
While the black feline’s reputation in Western Europe is generally dark, there are some bright spots. For example, English and Irish sailors in the 17th through 20th centuries believed having a black cat aboard assured a safe journey. For this reason, black cats were often made ship’s cats—where they were also helpful in protecting the ship’s stores against vermin. Sailors’ families also embraced the black cat at home, believing its presence would assure their loved ones’ safe return from the sea. During the times of sailors and oceanic exploration, black cats were thought to be assurance for a safe return. The fact that they also were believed to bring wealth was a bonus! In fact, they were thought to be so lucky that prices to purchase black cats were so high, unfortunately most seafarers couldn’t afford them.
Black cats possesses strong powers of good. If you keep your black cats happy and safe, they will keep you happy and safe. If you don’t have a black cat in real life to guard your home, a black cat figurine facing north will keep bad energy and spirits away. And while we’re on the subject of gods and demons, in Norse mythology the goddess of love, fertility and beauty, Freya, rides on a chariot pulled by two black cats. To win favor with Freya, farmers would leave bowls of milk for her companions in their fields. Freya would then bless them with a good harvest.
In the south of France, black cats have been called “matagot” and are known as “magician cats” or even “money cats.” If shown the proper respect, like being given the first bite of dinner, having a nice bed to sleep in or having a home even after their owner’s death, the matagot will reward their person with wealth and good luck. This belief does have some ties to black cats and negative